Tuesday, 18 June 2024 00:00

Bunions are bony bumps that form on the joint at the base of the big toe, causing the toe to deviate towards the other toes. They appear as swollen, protruding lumps on the side of the foot and can be red and tender. The condition can cause significant discomfort, including pain, swelling, and restricted movement of the big toe. Bunions often develop due to inherited foot structure, wearing tight or ill-fitting shoes, arthritis, or excessive stress on the feet. High heels and pointed shoes are common culprits in exacerbating bunions. Symptoms typically include pain, especially while walking, and inflammation surrounding the affected joint. Treatment for bunions ranges from conservative measures to surgery. Wearing wider shoes, using bunion pads, and taking anti-inflammatory medications can help to alleviate symptoms. Orthotic devices may help correct foot alignment. In severe cases, surgical intervention may be necessary to realign the bone and relieve pain. Untreated bunions can lead to complications such as bursitis or hammertoes. If you have a bunion that is causing you discomfort, it is suggested that you schedule an appointment with a podiatrist for treatment. 

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Scott Matthews, DPM, MD of Salem Foot Care . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Wikesboro, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 11 June 2024 00:00

Ankle fractures refer to breaks in any bones that make up the ankle joint, typically involving the tibia, fibula, or talus. These fractures can be caused by trauma from falls, sports injuries, or vehicular accidents, as well as overuse injuries or underlying conditions like osteoporosis. The ankle joint is composed of three main bones which are the tibia, fibula, and talus, along with the surrounding ligaments and tendons that provide stability and support. Injury may involve any of these structures, ranging from minor hairline fractures to severe breaks that displace the bones. Depending on the severity and location of the fracture, treatment may involve immobilization with a cast or brace, realignment of displaced bones through manipulation or surgery, and rehabilitation to restore strength and function. Prompt medical attention is vital to prevent complications and ensure proper long-term healing. If you have broken your ankle, it is suggested that you make an emergency appointment with a podiatrist who can accurately diagnose the injury and offer treatment options.

Broken ankles need immediate treatment. If you are seeking treatment, contact Scott Matthews, DPM, MD from Salem Foot Care . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet. 

Broken Ankles
A broken ankle is experienced when a person fractures their tibia or fibula in the lower leg and ankle area. Both of these bones are attached at the bottom of the leg and combine to form what we know to be our ankle.

When a physician is referring to a break of the ankle, he or she is usually referring to a break in the area where the tibia and fibula are joined to create our ankle joint. Ankles are more prone to fractures because the ankle is an area that suffers a lot of pressure and stress. There are some obvious signs when a person experiences a fractured ankle, and the following symptoms may be present.

Symptoms of a Fractured Ankle

  • Excessive pain when the area is touched or when any pressure is placed on the ankle
  •  Swelling around the area
  •  Bruising of the area
  • Area appears to be deformed

If you suspect an ankle fracture, it is recommended to seek treatment as soon as possible. The sooner you have your podiatrist diagnose the fracture, the quicker you’ll be on the way towards recovery.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Wikesboro, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about All About Broken Ankles
Tuesday, 04 June 2024 00:00

A Jones fracture occurs in the fifth metatarsal bone of the foot and has distinct symptoms that necessitate prompt medical attention. Typically caused by a severe direct impact, this avulsion fracture involves the tearing away of a bone fragment by tendons or muscles. Acute pain is often the primary indicator of a Jones fracture, and individuals experiencing persistent pain at the base of the foot should seek immediate medical attention. Other symptoms associated with a Jones fracture include swelling, bruising, and impaired movement of the little toe. Contrary to common belief, movement may still be possible despite the fracture, but will be accompanied by significant pain. Impaired balance also can signal a potential Jones fracture, highlighting the importance of recognizing all symptoms. Swelling, typically localized around the fifth metatarsal bone and pinky toe is another indication of the likelihood of a Jones fracture. Typically, Jones fractures require approximately six to eight weeks to heal properly, and the foot may be immobilized in a cast during this period to promote optimal healing. If you suspect you may have sustained a Jones fracture, it is suggested that you make an emergency appointment with a podiatrist for a thorough evaluation, including X-rays, and appropriate treatment.

A broken foot requires immediate medical attention and treatment. If you need your feet checked, contact Scott Matthews, DPM, MD from Salem Foot Care . Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Broken Foot Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

A broken foot is caused by one of the bones in the foot typically breaking when bended, crushed, or stretched beyond its natural capabilities. Usually the location of the fracture indicates how the break occurred, whether it was through an object, fall, or any other type of injury. 

Common Symptoms of Broken Feet:

  • Bruising
  • Pain
  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Blue in color
  • Numbness
  • Cold
  • Misshapen
  • Cuts
  • Deformities

Those that suspect they have a broken foot shoot seek urgent medical attention where a medical professional could diagnose the severity.

Treatment for broken bones varies depending on the cause, severity and location. Some will require the use of splints, casts or crutches while others could even involve surgery to repair the broken bones. Personal care includes the use of ice and keeping the foot stabilized and elevated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Wikesboro, NC . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment for a Broken Foot
Friday, 31 May 2024 00:00

Do you suffer from heel pain when you get up in the morning? If so, you should seek the professional help of your podiatrist and have a proper diagnosis performed. Heel pain can be caused by several different foot-related conditions.

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